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One of the great Catch-22s of recruiting people for self-employed sales jobs is the question of experience; you want to hire someone at the best price – perhaps even on a commission-only basis – but ideally you still want someone who can hit the ground running, without the need for extensive on-the-job training.

The most experienced individuals are always likely to be snapped up by the most lucrative of marketing roles, often permanent, full-time, in-house positions with a competitive starting salary and good benefits, so where does that leave the rest of the market?

Hidden sales potential

Perhaps surprisingly, the answer is that there is even greater potential out there, for those employers who are willing to ‘take a risk’ on enthusiastic individuals who are keen to work in self-employed sales jobs, but who perhaps do not have the greatest amount of demonstrable industry experience.

The fact is, there is no longer a binary distinction between marketers and consumers – we all encounter the hard sell on a daily basis, to such an extent that many people already have a clear opinion in their own mind of what is an acceptable way to sell goods and services, and what is an invasion of privacy.

Consider the TV commercials that are aired in the run-up to Christmas – the watercooler moments that follow the first screening of, for example, the John Lewis ad, tend not to involve discussing the products advertised, but the conversation revolves around the ad itself. We have become a nation of have-a-go marketers.

Determination is key

For those working in self-employed sales jobs, it is more than just a case of ‘having a go’, and the stakes are high to prove their worth, earn a substantial living, and plan for their next contract once the current job at hand comes to an end.

Self-employed marketers working on a commission-only basis have more at risk than the company they work for, whose overall income is unlikely to depend on just one individual’s performance – unlike the income of that individual themselves, which can depend absolutely on making enough sales day by day.

But in all of this, you still need some peace of mind that the person you hire is not simply playing at being Don Draper for a month or two – which is where a direct sales recruitment agency can help, by vetting candidates and referring only the best to you for interview.

Personality Matters

That does not mean being overly concerned with direct industry experience, but can mean looking at other factors too: soft skills such as communication and psychology; experience of different cultures and ability to adapt to an audience; perhaps even social media presence or experience of self-promotion online.

Such factors are the true modern-day equivalent of the kind of real-world experience that serves people in self-employed sales jobs well – allowing you to hire talented, enthusiastic individuals on their first foray into the marketing sector, and consequently gaining access to those soft skills for the smallest possible financial risk.

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